Essential Oils

Rosemary essential oil: Uses in a diffuser

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Sources: Mediterranean countries (Europe, Tunisia)rosemary essential oil diffuser
Extraction: Steam distilled
Note: Middle
Scent: Strong, woody, camphor
Key Points:

  • Good for mental clarity, fatigue
  • Pay attention to chemotypes (see below)
  • Useful for headaches

Properties: analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, mucolytic, stimulant
Uses: mental clarity, headaches, fatigues, congestion, sinusitis, colds, flu, airborne germs
Cautions:  Do not use at night due to stimulating properties, also use in small doses due to its stimulating nature.  Do not use during pregnancy or if you have high blood pressure or are epileptic. Not for use on young children.  May irritate skin.

Rosemary has a fresh, invigorating scent that is wonderful in diffuser blends.  I personally love to mix sweet orange with rosemary for a fresh scent that also helps me to stay focused when I work at home. It is uplifting and is associated with mental clarity. Historically, rosemary has been thought to help with memory.

Rosemary is useful for congestion, coughs and headaches making it a great choice when you have a cold. As a component of the four thieves blend, it also has anti-infectious properties.  In a diffuser, it can help to control airborne germs.

Rosemary comes in a few different chemotypes. This means that the oil will have a different balance of constituents (the chemical components of the oil).  It is important to know which chemotype you have, yet many companies do not specify the chemotype on their product website. If you are unsure, contact the company and ask.  The different chemotypes have different uses.

The two most common chemotypes of rosemary are:
Rosemary CT 1,8 cineol:  Good for diffuser blends.  Use for congestion, fatigue, stimulant, mental clarity etc.
Rosemary CT verbenone:  More commonly used in skin and hair care.  May be useful for sinusitis.

 

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